Night School — Spring 2020

Night School — Spring 2020

Night School at Park School is a wonderful opportunity for adults in the Park community, including parents, grandparents, alumni, parents of alumni, prospective parents, and other friends of Park, to experience what it’s like to be a Park student. Our extraordinary faculty offers courses in the spring and in the fall, and registration fills quickly!

Please note that classes may be canceled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum.

Art History: Generations Lost

Susan Asdourian, Upper School Art History

Monday, March 30, 7–8:30 p.m. (This night has been cancelled)
Monday. April 27, 7–8:30 p.m. (This night has been cancelled)
Art History: Generations Lost can be taken as a one-evening class on either night, or as a two-part course. The instructor designed the classes to work in tandem.
Room 221 (3rd floor of the Wyman Arts Center)

We all die. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will. — Chuck Palahniuk

“Art history is full of artists whose careers, cut short by early death, haunt us with their unfulfilled promise.” So begins a review by Roberta Smith in the New York Times of an exhibit dedicated to the work of the late painter Noah Davis, who died in 2015 at the age of 32.

But the tragedy of a life cut short does not mean a life without consequence or meaning — far from it. In this course we will celebrate the brief, blazing careers of artists whose time was short, but whose impact lives on. We’ll discuss artists from across the ages who worked in a wide variety of media and forms, from luminous Venetian landscapes to activist graffiti art. And in their very human and particular stories, we’ll touch on topics ranging from history-shaping disease (the Black Death and AIDS) to the toxic dangers of late 20th century sculpture materials and sudden fame.

Class time will include short lectures and videos, and much back and forth as we examine works together. No experience is needed; if you have eyes in your head, you have something to say about art. All are welcome!

Tuition for this course is $25.

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Participants: minimum of 6 and a maximum of 15.

Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum. 


Climate Citizens: Tools to Help You Think, Plan, and Act Sustainably

Sarah Howell, Middle School Science
Emily Schuttenberg, Lower School Science

Monday, March 30: Simulations of Sustainability and Cooperation, 7-9 p.m. (This night has been cancelled)
Monday. April 27:
Moving from Understanding Sustainability to Climate Action, 7-9 p.m.
Climate Citizens can be taken as a one-evening class on either night, or as a two-part course. The instructors designed the classes to work in tandem. (This night has been cancelled)
Lower School Room 236

Monarch butterflies. Honey bees. Australia’s wildfires. Fisheries. Forests. In a time when we are surrounded by messages of environmental trouble, where and how do we start to take meaningful action that will make a difference? How do we maintain hope for a positive outcome for our planet? These interactive workshops will examine some of the structures and dynamics that support both sustainable and unsustainable systems. You will gain practical tools to make impactful changes in your thinking, habits, and behaviors around sustainability. 

The significant problems we face cannot be solved with the same level of thinking we used to create them.” — Albert Einstein

Workshop 1: Simulations of Sustainability and Cooperation. Participants will engage in a series of scenarios and gameplay to explore the impact of sustainable and unsustainable decision-making. The game will be followed by a group discussion, where we debrief the experience and delve into examples of sustainable and unsustainable models of thinking. This workshop is based on the work and philosophy of The Cloud Institute’s Education for Sustainability program. 

Workshop 2: Moving from Understanding Sustainability to Climate Action. Participants will engage in a facilitated workshop using the En-Roads climate simulation tool — developed by Climate Interactive and MIT’s Sustainability Initiative — to understand how we can achieve our climate goals. Through this innovative, interactive tool, participants will explore how policy changes in energy, land use, technology, consumption, investment, and the global economy influence climate change. We will also discuss how individual lives are impacted by these policies. 

Tuition for this course is $25.

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Participants: minimum of 12 and a maximum of 20.*

*Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum. 


Creation Stories

Liz Hirsch, Upper School English, Co-Director of College Counseling

Monday, March 30
7–8:30 p.m.
Room 349 in the Upper School

What do the stories we tell about our beginnings say about us? Together we will do a close reading of Genesis 1-3 and look at some other ancient creation stories for comparison. In addition, we will discuss some modern responses. The questions we explore as they relate to these texts may include: How do we humans see ourselves in relation to nature and the divine? What notions about gender and hierarchy are embedded in these stories? Our challenge will be to read familiar stories with fresh eyes and see if we can’t discover something new.

Tuition for this course is $25.

This class has been cancelled.

Participants: minimum of 6 and a maximum of 14.

Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum. 


The Journey That Changes Lives: The Baltimore Civil Rights Trip

Traci Wright, Upper School Dean of Students
Angela Balcita, Upper School English
Civil Rights Trip Student Participants

Monday, March 30, 7-9 p.m. (This night has been cancelled)
Monday. April 27, 7-9 p.m. (This night has been cancelled)
The Journey That Changes Lives can be taken as a one-evening class on either night, or as a two-part course. The instructor designed the classes to work in tandem.
Middle School Commons

You’ve heard about the Civil Rights Trip. You’ve probably contributed to its fundraising efforts. But now, find out for yourself exactly why this annual trip has been life-changing for so many students and adults for the past 17 years. You’ll be guided through discussions, interactive activities, and presentations that will simulate the experiences of participants who have gone on this journey. From Greensboro to Montgomery, from Selma to Memphis, and everywhere in between, follow the Civil Rights Movement trail, learn about lesser-known activists who lived and died for change, and immerse yourself in meaningful dialogue about the ways racism, educational inequities, and economic disparities in our city and country are still present today. 

Part I: Monday, March 30, 7-9 p.m.

Our itinerary includes Greensboro, Atlanta, Montgomery, and Selma, and we’ll examine the evolution of the Civil Rights Movement. We’ll look specifically at how atrocities of the past continue to the present: Jim Crow and New Jim Crow, slavery and mass incarceration, and voter discrimination and suppression.

Part II: Monday, April 27, 7-9 p.m.

As we continue our travels in the south through Birmingham, Jackson, the Mississippi Delta, and Little Rock, we’ll consider the youth in the Movement. We’ll study the Children’s March, the bombing at 16th Street Baptist Church, the Freedom Riders, and the integration of Little Rock Central High School. With a focus on the future, we’ll look at how Dr. King’s legacy lives on. 

Tuition for this course is $25.*

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Participants: minimum of 8 and a maximum of 24.**
*All proceeds from this seminar go directly to the Civil Rights Trip fund.

**Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum. 


The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson

Gregory Brandt — Upper School English

Monday, March 30, 2020
7–8:30 p.m.

Room 348 in the Upper School

When she was in her 60s, Tove Jansson, creator of the famous Moomintroll cartoon strips and children’s books, began to write for adults. The True Deceiver, a novella published in 1982, explores, in the words of Ursula Le Guin, the “vivid contrast and interplay of truthfulness and deceit, purity and complexity, ice and thaw, winter and spring ….” Of the prose, Le Guin writes, “Jansson’s range, though effortlessly controlled, is great. Her spare exactness can express not only tension and stress but deeply felt emotion, expansion, relaxation and peace. Her description is unhurried, accurate and vivid, an artist’s vision. Her style is not at all ‘poetic’—quite the contrary. It is prose of the very highest order; it is pure prose. Through its quiet clarity we see unreachable depths, threatening darkness, promised treasures. The sentences are beautiful in structure, movement and cadence. They have inevitable rightness. And this is a translation! Thomas Teal deserves to have his name on the title page with Jansson’s: he has worked the true translator’s miracle.”

Participants should get the New York Review of Books edition of The True Deceiver, translated by Thomas Teal (181 pages). ISBN 978-1-59017-329-9.

Tuition for this one-evening seminar is $25.

This class has been cancelled.

Participants: minimum of 8 and maximum of 18.

Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum.


The Summer Book by Tove Jansson

Gregory Brandt — Upper School English

Monday, April 27, 2020
7–8:30 p.m.

Room 348 in the Upper School

Tove Jansson wrote The Summer Book in 1972, just after her mother died. In The Guardian of London, Antonia Windsor describes this short novel as both “a meditation on life and love and surviving in the natural world” and “a wonderfully humane and gentle book.”

Participants should get the New York Review of Books edition of The Summer Book, translated by Thomas Teal (170 pages). ISBN 978-1-59017-268-1.

Tuition for this one-evening seminar is $25.

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Participants: minimum of 8 and maximum of 18.

Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum.


Welding Basics

Michael Guarraia — Upper School Science

Session I — Wednesday, April 1 (This night has been cancelled)
Session II — Wednesday, April 8 (This night has been cancelled)

Session III — Wednesday, April 15 (This night has been cancelled)

Session IV — Wednesday, April 22 (This night has been cancelled)
6–9 p.m.
This is a one-evening class. Only register for one evening.
Athletic Center (Main Lobby)

This class will teach the basics of something called Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding, or Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW). We’ll start with an explanation of the actual process, how it works, and safety considerations. We will then work on material selection, cutting, surface preparation, and subsequently run some practice welds.  Once proficient, we will end by actually fabricating a small project that students can take home. No materials fee. Wear clothing that can get dirty!!

Tuition for this one-evening class is $75.*

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Participants: This one-evening class is limited to 3 students and has a minimum of 2 students.

*Note: Class may be cancelled (with a full refund) if enrollment does not meet the minimum. 


If you have any questions about Night School, please contact:

Adrienne Peres
Associate Director of Development
aperes@parkschool.net
410.339.4174