Peter Baida '68 Writer-in-Residence

The Writer-in-Residence program was established in memory of Peter Baida, a member of Park's Class of 1968. His nine story collection, A Nurse's Story, includes the first-prize winner in the 1999 O. Henry Awards. The award-winning title story, a revelation of a dying nurse's memories, is but one of his close-up explorations of moral and ethical dilemmas and the impact of individual choices on society. 

Peter Baida also wrote Poor Richard's Legacy: American Business Values from Benjamin Franklin to Donald Trump, and was published in The Gettysburg ReviewAmerican Literary ReviewThe New York TimesAmerican Heritage, and The Atlantic Monthly.

Since its inception, the program has brought exceptional writers-in-residence to our Upper School. In the fall of 2013, Park received a generous gift to the Peter Baida '68 Fund permanently endowing the program AND expanding it to include writers-in-residence for our Middle School.  

Park School Writers-in-Residence

 

2015-2016

Jess Row '93

An award-winning author, Jess Row '93 was named a "Best Young American Novelist" in 2007 by Granta. Author of The Train to Lo Wu, Nobody Ever Gets Lost, and Your Face in Mine. His stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Tin House, Conjunctions, Boston ReviewPloughshares, Granta, American Short Fiction, Threepenny Review, Ontario Review, Harvard Review, and elsewhere. Winner of two Pushcart Prizes and a PEN/O. Henry Award, and recipient of an NEA fellowship in fiction and a Whiting Writers Award.


2013-2014

Sam Baker

Songwriter. 

“Life is a gift. I went through a lot of bitterness – a lot of anger. But those things are toxic. Gratitude for what remains is more helpful than resentment for what was lost. Ultimately, I came to understand that these days are wicked short and terribly beautiful.  All I’ve got—no matter what I hold in my hands, drive around in, or put in the bank—all I’ve got is this one breath, and if I’m lucky, I get another.”

Sam Baker


2012-2013

Laura Amy Schlitz

Author of children's literature. 2008 Newbery Medal recipient for Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village (2007) and the author of the 2013 Newbery Honor Book Splendors and Glooms (2012), among others. A beloved librarian and storyteller at Park, we were pleased to name Laura our Writer-in-Residence during this, our Centennial year. 


2011-2012

Campbell McGrath

American poet. Recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (a.k.a. Genius Grant), a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Witter Bynner Fellowship from the Library of Congress, and is a Professor at Florida International University. Received many awards for his books of poetry American Noise (1994), Florida Poems (2002), Seven Notebooks (2007), In the Kingdom of the Sea Monkeys (2012).


2010-2011

Justin Kramon '98

A graduate of The Park School of Baltimore (1998) and Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Justin Kramon has published stories in Glimmer Train, Story Quarterly, Boulevard, Fence, TriQuarterly, and others. He has received honors from the Michener-Copernicus Society of America, Best American Short Stories, the Hawthornden International Writers’ Fellowship, and the Bogliasco Foundation. He teaches at Gotham Writers’ Workshop in New York City and at the Iowa Young Writers’ Workshop. (goodreads.com). While at Park, he read from his debut novel, Finny (2010).


2009-2010

Andrei Codrescu

Poet, novelist, essayist. Codrescu has been a regular commentator on National Public Radio’s news program, All Things Considered, since 1983. He won the 1995 Peabody Award for the film Road Scholar, an American road saga that he wrote and starred in, and is a two-time winner of the Pushcart Prize. He has been called “one of our most magical writers” by The New York Times. While at Park, Codrescu shared recent NPR essays and recent essays from New Orleans, Mon Amour.


2007-2008

Li-Young Lee

Poet and author of Rose (1986), The City In Which I Love You (1990), The Winged Seed: A Remembrance (1995), The Book of My Nights (2001). Lee's poems have received many honors, including a Lannan Literary Award, a Whiting Writer's Award, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.


2006-2007

Theresa Rebeck

Writer for the stage, television, and film. Awarded a Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award and a Writers Guild of America Award for Episodic Drama for NYPD Blue. Her new play The Scene, starring Patricia Heaton and Tony Shaloub, opened in New York in January 2007. For her work on Omnium Gatherum (2003), co-written with Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros, she was a finalist the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Wrote the radio play Ten After Eleven, a play inspired by the Kitty Genovese murder. Screenwriting credits include Catwoman and Harriet the Spy.


2005-2006

McKay Jenkins

Professor of English at University of Delaware, journalist and scholar of American literature. His books include Bloody Falls of the Coppermine: Madness and Murder in the Arctic Barren Lands (2005), The Last Ridge: The Epic Story of America's First Mountain Soldiers and the Assault on Hitler's Europe (2003), and The White Death: Tragedy and Heroism in an Avalanche Zone (2000).


2004-2005

Jess Row '93

Row is a 2004 National Endowment for the Arts Literary Fellow and award-winning short story writer. His short story, "The Secrets of Bats," earned a Pushcart Prize and is included in The Pushcart Prize XXVI and in The Best American Short Stories 2001. "Heaven Lake" appears in The Best American Short Stories 2003.